One way to cope with stress is to set realistic goals at home and at work – even if that means lowering your expectations a bit. Other things that can help include accepting that some events are beyond your control, preparing well for things that you know may be stressful (such as a speech or an interview), trying to see change as a challenge instead of a threat, eating and drinking sensibly, getting plenty of rest, and exercising regularly.
Genetic risk factors have been documented for all anxiety disorders. Clinical genetic studies indicate that heritability estimates for anxiety disorders range from 30-67%. Many studies, past and present, have focused on identifying specific genetic factors that increase one's risk for an anxiety disorder. To date, an array of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or small variations in genetic code, that confer heightened risk for anxiety have been discovered. For the most part, the variants that have been associated with risk for anxiety are located within genes that are critical for the expression and regulation of neurotransmitter systems or stress hormones.

Because there are many medical conditions that can cause anxiety-like sensations and symptoms, we recommend that all new, changing, persistent, and returning symptoms be discussed with your doctor. If your doctor concludes that your sensations and symptoms are solely stress related (including anxiety-caused stress), you can be confident that there isn't another medical reason for your symptoms. Generally, most doctors can easily determine the difference between stress- and anxiety-caused sensations and symptoms from those caused by other medical conditions.


We humans are chemistry, and nothing could make this clearer than the chilling story of an old family friend who suffered lifelong anxiety and panic attacks. After decades of living with this curse, he was diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder. One of the consequences of this genetic disorder are small tumours on the adrenal glands that cause spikes in adrenalin production. He had one on his adrenal gland. The gland was excised, and he was cured — or perhaps “set free” would be a better description.
Selective mutism: A somewhat rare disorder associated with anxiety is selective mutism. Selective mutism occurs when people fail to speak in specific social situations despite having normal language skills. Selective mutism usually occurs before the age of 5 and is often associated with extreme shyness, fear of social embarrassment, compulsive traits, withdrawal, clinging behavior, and temper tantrums. People diagnosed with selective mutism are often also diagnosed with other anxiety disorders.
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